Chinese painting of Confucius

Courses

Our goal for students after taking our classes is that they: (1) understand philosophy as an historical discipline, (2) develop clear, logical, and critical thinking skills, (3) inculcate an appreciation for and competence in the applied dimensions of philosophy, and (4) demonstrate knowledge of the methodological dimensions of philosophy. We offer a wide range of course topics that should appeal to most any student, no matter your major.

PHIL 101. Introduction to Philosophy: Ethics (3) [GE] 
Philosophical inquiry, with emphasis on problems of moral value. Students are encouraged to think independently and formulate their own tentative conclusions concerning a variety of vital contemporary issues facing individuals and society.

PHIL 102. Introduction to Philosophy: Knowledge and Reality (3) [GE] 
Introduction to philosophical inquiry with emphasis on problems of knowledge and reality. Students are encouraged to think independently and formulate their own tentative conclusions.

PHIL 120. Introduction to Logic (3) [GE] 
Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the Entry-Level Mathematics requirement. 
Introduction to deductive and inductive logic. Logic and language. Analysis of fallacies. Uses of logic in science and in daily life.

PHIL 200. Critical Thinking and Composition (3) [GE] 
Prerequisites: Satisfaction of the English Placement Test and Writing Competency requirements and Africana Studies 120 or American Indian Studies 120 or Chicana or Chicano Studies 111B or English 100 [or Rhetoric and Writing Studies 100] or Linguistics 100 or Rhetoric and Writing Studies 101. Proof of completion of prerequisites required: Test scores or verification of exemption; grade report or copy of transcript. 
Introduction to critical thinking and writing. Evaluation and development of correct reasoning and effective style and organization in argumentative writing. Correct deductive and inductive reasoning. Fallacies. Critical appraisal of evidence. Construction of rebuttals and counter-arguments. (Formerly numbered Philosophy 110)

PHIL 296. Experimental Topics (1-4) 
Selected topics. May be repeated with new content. See Class Schedule for specific content. Limit of nine units of any combination of 296, 496, 596 courses applicable to a bachelor’s degree.

PHIL 299. Special Study (3) 
Prerequisite: Consent of department chair and instructor. Individual study.

PHIL 305. Classics of Western Philosophy (3) [GE] 
Prerequisite: Completion of the General Education requirement in Foundations of Learning II.C., Humanities.
Analysis of major texts selected from diverse historical periods in Western philosophy. Texts will illustrate different world views (e.g., Platonism, Stoicism, Skepticism) and their relationship to other disciplines and to present world views.

PHIL 310. Philosophy and Human Nature (3) [GE] 
Prerequisite: Completion of the General Education requirement in Foundations of Learning II.C., Humanities. 
Concept of human nature. Descriptive and normative aspects of major theories of human nature.

PHIL 312. Women and Philosophy (3) [GE] 
Prerequisite: Completion of the General Education requirement in Foundations of Learning II.C., Humanities.
Exploration of women’s contributions to philosophy, both present and historically. Concepts relating to women and femininity, both by the philosophical canon and by more recent feminist philosophers.

PHIL 315. Philosophy and Literature (3) [GE] 
Prerequisite: Completion of the General Education requirement in Foundations of Learning II.C., Humanities. 
Study of literature of philosophical significance and of philosophical problems of literature. (Formerly numbered Philosophy 334.)

PHIL 325. A Major Philosophical Topic (3) 
Prerequisite: Completion of the General Education requirement in Foundations of Learning II.C., Humanities.
General introduction to a major philosophical topic (e.g. cosmopolitan justice, freedom of the will, the nature and existence of God, theory and evidence). Maximum credit six units.

PHIL 328. Philosophy, Racism, and Justice (3) [GE] 
Prerequisites: Upper division standing and completion of the General Education requirement in Foundations of Learning II.C., Humanities.
Philosophical concepts and theories of racism and racial justice. Arguments for and against such theories.

PHIL 329. Social Ethics (3) [GE] 
Prerequisite: Completion of the General Education requirement in Foundations of Learning II.C., Humanities. 
Ethical issues of contemporary life. Individualism vs. collectivism; democracy vs. dictatorship; ethical problems arising in law, medicine, business, government and interpersonal relationships.

PHIL 330. Biomedical Ethics (3) [GE] 
Prerequisite: Completion of the General Education requirement in Foundations of Learning II.C., Humanities. 
Value judgments upon which medicine is based and the ethical issues which medicine faces.

PHIL 331. Ethics in Health Care (3) [GE] 
Prerequisite: Completion of the General Education requirement in Foundations of Learning II.C., Humanities.
Ethical, professional, and legal standards. Promoting patient well being given competing interests, diverse cultural and religious beliefs, increasing demands, practical constraints.

PHIL 332. Environmental Ethics (3) [GE] (Same course as Sustainability 332) 
Prerequisite: Completion of General Education requirement in Foundations of Learning II.C., Humanities. 
Development of traditional values concerning the natural environment. Reasons for altering values in light of modern changes in relationship of human beings to the environment. Application of ethical principles to actions affecting the environment.

PHIL 333. Food Ethics [GE]
Prerequisite: Upper division standing.
Ethics of what we eat to include fair-trade food sourcing, food rituals, shaming, waste, use of GMOs, veganism, and vegetarianism. 

PHIL 335. Philosophy of Business Ethics (3) [GE] 
Prerequisite: Upper division standing and completion of the General Education requirement in Foundations of Learning II.C., Humanities.
Moral status of business practices; arguments and theories regarding ways to run businesses and corporations; issues that arise in everyday practices of businesses. May not be taken in place of Management 444, required of Fowler College of Business majors.

PHIL 340. Morality of War and Peace (3) [GE] 
Prerequisite: Completion of General Education requirement in Foundations of Learning II. C., Humanities. 
Historical and contemporary arguments regarding morality of war, pacifism, and terrorism, with contemporary applications.

PHIL 341. Logic and the Law (3) [GE]
Prerequisite: Completion of the General Education requirement in Foundations of Learning II.C., Humanities. 
Logic in legal contexts. Inductive reasoning methods applied to legal briefs, case studies, and LSATs. Construction, presentation, and evaluation of written and oral arguments, using historical and contemporary legal decisions.

PHIL 342. Morality and the Law (3) [GE]
Prerequisite: Completion of the General Education requirement in Foundations of Learning II.C., Humanities.
Understanding and application of the law via contemporary moral controversies in case law and legal practice.

PHIL 344. Global Justice (3) [GE] 
Prerequisite: Completion of General Education requirement in Foundations of Learning II. C., Humanities. 
Current debates in political philosophy concerning the justification, content, and scope of duties of global justice to include distributive justice, nationalism vs. cosmopolitanism, morality of immigration controls, justification of human rights, and limits of sovereignty.

PHIL 351. Chinese Philosophy (3) [GE] (Same course as Asian Studies 351) 
Prerequisite: Completion of the General Education requirement in Foundations of Learning II.C., Humanities. 
Philosophical traditions which have shaped the intellectual life and culture of China. Emphasis on foundational texts surviving from pre-Han China.

PHIL 353. Buddhist Philosophy (3) [GE] 
Prerequisite: Completion of the General Education requirement in Foundations of Learning II.C., Humanities. 
Intellectual traditions within Buddhism, both ancient and contemporary, including key areas of metaphysics, epistemology, and axiology.

PHIL 375. Symposium in Philosophy (3) 
Prerequisite: Three units in philosophy. 
Different philosophers from different areas in philosophy (e.g. metaphysics, ethics, aesthetics) present series of 13 to 15 lectures on one particular issue (e.g. Darwinism, free will, war and peace). May be repeated with new content. Maximum credit six units.

PHIL 401A. History of Philosophy: Pre-Socratic through Medieval (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the General Education requirement in Foundations of Learning II.C., Humanities.
From Pre-Socratic through Medieval. Not open to students with credit in Philosophy 411 and 412.

PHIL 401B. History of Philosophy: Renaissance and Early Modern (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the General Education requirement in Foundations of Learning II.C., Humanities.
Renaissance and early modern philosophy. Not open to students with credit in Philosophy 412 and 413.

PHIL 496. Experimental Topics (1-4) 
Selected topics. May be repeated with new content. See Class Schedule for specific content. Limit of nine units of any combination of 296, 496, 596 courses applicable to a bachelor’s degree.

PHIL 499. Special Study (1-3) 
Prerequisites: Six upper division units in philosophy and prior arrangements with a supervising instructor.
Individual study. Maximum credit six units.

PHIL 505. Nineteenth-Century European Philosophy (3) 
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing.
Major European philosophers of the nineteenth century. May include Hegel, Kierkegaard, Marx, Mill, Nietzsche, and Schopenhauer. (Formerly numbered Philosophy 414.)

PHIL 506. Twentieth-Century Continental Philosophy (3) 
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing. 
Major figures and movements in European philosophy from Husserl to the present.

PHIL 508. Existentialism (3) 
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing. 
The philosophical aspects of existentialism. Major emphasis is on the diversity of thought within a common approach as this is shown in individual thinkers.

PHIL 509. Theory of Ethics (3) 
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing. 
Advanced topics in ethical theory, including normative ethics and meta-ethics. May include historical or contemporary readings or both. Issues may include content of moral value, nature of moral judgment, and accounts of virtue and right action. (Formerly numbered Philosophy 528.)

PHIL 510. Philosophy of Law (3) 
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing. 
Philosophical and ethical investigation into the nature of law, rights, liberty, responsibility, and punishment.

PHIL 512. Political Philosophy (3) 
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing. 
Selected aspects of the political structures within which we live, such as law, power, sovereignty, justice, liberty, welfare.

PHIL 514. Philosophy of Art (3) 
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing. 
The nature of aesthetic experience. Principal Western theories of art in relation to actual artistic production and to the function of art in society. (Formerly numbered Philosophy 542.)

PHIL 515. Philosophy of Film (3) 
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing.
Investigation into metaphysical, aesthetic, and epistemological dimensions of film. Narration, authorship, cognitive and emotional engagement, social and philosophical ramifications.

PHIL 516. Non-Western Aesthetics (3) 
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing.
How non-Western cultures developed aesthetic theories complementing, challenging, or expanding more familiar Amero-eurocentric theories. Historical and contemporary works representing a spectrum of non-Western philosophies.

PHIL 521. Deductive Logic (3) 
Prerequisite: Philosophy 120. 
Principles of inference for symbolic deductive systems; connectives, quantifiers, relations and sets. Interpretations of deductive systems in mathematics, science and ordinary language. Not open to students with credit in Mathematics 523.

PHIL 523. Theory of Knowledge (3) 
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing. 
Philosophical analysis of knowledge, including conceptions of belief, justification, and truth.

PHIL 530. Metaphysics (3)
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing. 
Prominent theories of reality, e.g., realism and nominalism, materialism and idealism, teleology and determinism. (Formerly numbered Philosophy 525.)

PHIL 534. Philosophy of Language (3) 
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing.
An introduction to theories of meaning for natural languages and formal systems; concepts of truth, synonymy and analyticity; related epistemological and ontological problems. (Formerly numbered Philosophy 531.)

PHIL 535. Philosophy of Religion (3) 
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing. 
Philosophical analysis of the nature and existence of God.

PHIL 536. Philosophy of Mind (3) 
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing. 
Prominent theories and arguments regarding relation between mind and body. Varieties of dualism considered along with major materialist rivals.

PHIL 537. Philosophy of Science (3)
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing. 
The basic concepts and methods underlying contemporary scientific thought. Contributions of the special sciences to a view of the universe as a whole.

PHIL 565. Asian Philosophies (3)
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing.
Dimensions of Asian philosophies, past and present. Encounter between Buddhism and post-modern science, contemporary Asian philosophers (“global gurus”) and their impact on non-Asian cultures, enigmatic notion of emptiness (sunya, wu). See Class Schedule for specific topic. May be repeated with new content. Maximum credit six units.

PHIL 575. A Major Philosopher (3) 
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing. 
The writings of one major philosopher. May be repeated with new content. See Class Schedule for specific content. Maximum credit six units applicable to the major. Maximum credit six units applicable to a master’s degree.

PHIL 576. A Major Philosophical Tradition (3) 
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing.
Focused study of a major philosophical tradition (e.g., Platonism, Confucianism, positivism). May be repeated with new content. See Class Schedule for specific content. Maximum credit six units applicable to the major. Maximum credit six units applicable to a master’s degree.

PHIL 577. A Major Philosophical Problem (3) 
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing.
Focused study of a major philosophical problem (e.g., the problem of evil, the problem of other minds, the existence of God). May be repeated with new content. See Class Schedule for specific content. Maximum credit six units applicable to the major. Maximum credit six units applicable to a master’s degree.

PHIL 578. Philosophical Methods (3) 
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing.
Focused study of major philosophical methods (e.g., uncertain inferences and non-bivalent logics, phenomenological method, deconstruction). May be repeated with new content. See Class Schedule for specific content. Maximum credit six units applicable to the major. Maximum credit six units applicable to a master’s degree.

PHIL 596. Selected Topics (3) 
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing. 
A critical analysis of a major problem or movement in philosophy. May be repeated with new content. See Class Schedule for specific content. Limit of nine units of any combination of 296, 496, 596 courses applicable to a bachelor’s degree. Maximum credit of nine units of 596 applicable to the major in philosophy. Credit for 596 and 696 applicable to a master’s degree with approval of the graduate adviser.

PHIL 599. Special Study (1-3) 
Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing.
Directed individual study in philosophy on a theme or topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Maximum credit six units. Maximum combined credit six units of Philosophy 599 and 798 applicable to the M.A. degree in Philosophy.

PHIL 600. Seminar in the History of Philosophy (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in philosophy.
A major philosopher, school, or problem. Their historical roots and subsequent historical significance. See Class Schedule for specific content. May be repeated with new content. Maximum credit 12 units applicable to a master’s degree.

PHIL 610. Seminar in Philosophical Problems: Values (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in philosophy.
Problems in such fields as ethics, politics, aesthetics. See Class Schedule for specific content. May be repeated with new content. Maximum credit 12 units applicable to a master’s degree.

PHIL 620. Seminar in Philosophical Problems: Knowledge and Reality (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in philosophy.
A problem or group of problems in metaphysics, epistemology and logic. See Class Schedule for specific content. May be repeated with new content. Maximum credit 12 units applicable to a master’s degree.

PHIL 630. Seminar in Current Philosophical Issues (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in philosophy.
Problems in current philosophical publications. See Class Schedule for specific content. May be repeated with new content. Maximum credit 12 units applicable to a master’s degree.

PHIL 650. Seminar in Teaching Philosophy (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in philosophy.
Critical thinking and writing skills to teach philosophy. Syllabus construction, teaching techniques, assessment, and outcomes measurement. (Formerly numbered Philosophy 701.)

PHIL 696. Seminar in Selected Topics (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in philosophy.
Intensive study in specific areas of philosophy. May be repeated with new content. See Class Schedule for specific content. Credit for 596 and 696 applicable to a master’s degree with approval of the graduate adviser.

PHIL 798. Special Study (1-3) Cr/NC/RP
Prerequisites: Twelve upper division units in philosophy and consent of staff; to be arranged with department chair and instructor.
Individual study. Maximum credit six units applicable to a master’s degree.

PHIL 799A. Thesis (3) Cr/NC/RP
Prerequisites: An officially appointed thesis committee and advancement to candidacy.
Preparation of a project or thesis for the master’s degree.

PHIL 799B. Thesis Extension (0) Cr/NC
Prerequisite: Prior registration in Thesis 799A with an assigned grade symbol of RP.
Registration required in any semester or term following assignment of RP in Course 799A in which the student expects to use the facilities and resources of the university; also student must be registered in the course when the completed thesis is granted final approval.

PHIL 799C. Comprehensive Examination Extension (0) Cr/NC
Prerequisites: Completion or concurrent enrollment in degree program courses. 
Registration required of students whose only requirement is completion of the comprehensive examination for the master’s degree. Registration in 799C limited to two semesters.

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